RESEARCH

Our research interests centre on understanding the processes driving, and consequences for people of, the persistence or collapse of marine habitats. A key feature of this research is to recognise, and incorporate, the inter-connectedness of the issues we examine; to explicitly explore the links between the physiological, ecological, and anthropological consequences of changing environmental conditions.

GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY

Global climate change is occurring. It can modify the activity and occurrence of marine organisms. We are, therefore, considering how marine plants and animals respond to manipulated conditions. Importantly, in natural systems, these creatures do not exist in isolation, and so we are also considering the role of species interactions and indirect effects. Of particular interest is understanding whether these indirect effects will modify (i.e. lessen or worsen) the direct effects observed?

LOCAL IMPACTS IN THE CONTEXT OF A GLOBALLY-CHANGING CLIMATE

Overlaid on the background of global change are a number of impacts driven by human activities at more local scales. Consequently, we are interested in exploring how management of local activities can mediate the impact of largely unmanageable global change. 

SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF ECOSYSTEM CHANGE

Organisms and the ecosystems they form provide a range of goods and services to human societies. This pattern of provisioning may, however, be modified in the future due to changed climate conditions. Therefore, we are looking to link biological and ecosystem changes with their consequences for human societies. Where these consequences are better understood, we may be able to develop more effective management strategies, benefiting future human populations.